Repertoriu[m] generale et succinctu[m]: veru[m]tamen valde vtile atq[ue] necessarium: co[n]tentoru[m] in quatuor collectorijs acutissimi ac p[ro]fundissimi theologi Gabrielis Biel super quatuor libros Sententiarum With medieval manuscript endpapers of Giles of Rome

By: Biel, Gabriel; Peter Lombard

Price: $1,900.00

Quantity: 1 available


A post-incunable edition of Gabriel Biel's most important work, a commentary on the "Sentences" of Peter Lombard, four volumes bound in two, in full vellum, with a large, beautiful medieval manuscript used as part of the binding in the first volume, which also has a woodcut title page printed in red and black. The work is in two volumes, both small folios measuring 11.75" x 8". The vellum is limp, contemporary vellum showing the marks of missing ties. The spines appear to be contemporary, as well, but are crudely attached with handsome old hand-written titles to the spine with a small decorative flourish. The end papers for the first volume have been constructed out of a large manuscript vellum leaf with three beautiful red initial "O"s with blue trailing decoration. The manuscript is interesting and quite scarce. It is a text with commentary and appears to be from an early 1400s copy of Giles of Rome's Theoremata de Esse et Essencia. Giles of Rome (Latin: Aegidius Romanus; c. 1243 - 22 December 1316), was an archbishop of Bourges who was famed for his logician commentary on the Organon by Aristotle. Giles was styled Doctor Fundatissimus ("Best-Grounded Teacher") by Pope Benedict XIV. He was Prior General of the Augustinian order and it is likely that Giles was a student of Thomas Aquinas during the period between 1269 and 1272. He began many of his commentaries on the works of Aristotle during the 1270s. The text of the manuscript is in 13 lines and the commentary is in 53 lines around it. It is in brown ink with delicate and lovely initials in red traced and detailed in blue. The manuscript leaf is wrapped around the b ook block of the first volume of the Beil - the fore-edge has been trimmed and the old sewing is visible. There is a fore-edge crack and lack at the bottom edge of the front leaf affecting 4 lines. The manuscript appears to have been part of the Biel for quite a while - the worm holes in the first few pages of the Biel are also present in the manuscript leaf. Condition of the Biel is good antiquarian. The limp vellum has normal staining with some occasional cracks and marks. The bottom of both volumes has old handwritten identification, as was typical in ancient libraries. First 5 leaves including the title page having worming, there are library ink stamps to the title pages, as well as some handwritten ownership marks, old library pocket in rear. Very light humidity staining at the end of Vol. II along with some scattered worming in the margins and gutter. Some browning but otherwise clean and unmarked. The title page woodcut is ornate and quite wonderful, full of lions, puti and flowers. Gothic type, in two columns, pages are unnumbered but [480] leaves. Signatures are: +ai-+a10, a1-8, b1-6, c1-6, d1-6, e1-6, f1-6, g1-6, h1-6, i1-6, k1-6, l1-6, m1-6, n1-6, o1-6, p1-8, aa1-8 ,bb1-6, cc1-6, dd1-6, ee1-6 ,ff1-6, gg1-6, hh1-6,ii1-6, kk1-6, ll1-6, mm1-6, nn1-6, oo1-6, +aa-+aa8. In Vol. II: A1-8, B1-6, C1-6, D1-6, E1-6, F1-6, G1-6, H1-6, J1-6, K1-6, L1-6, M1-6, N1-6, O1-6, P1-6, +A1-8, AA1-8, BB1-6, CC1-6, DD1-6, EE1-6, FF1-6, GG1-6, HH1-6, JJ1-6, KK1-6, LL1-6, MM1-6, NN1-6, OO1-6, PP1-6, QQ1-6, RR1-6, SS1-6, TT1-6, UU1-6, XX1-6, YY1-6, ZZ1-6, AAA1-8, BBB1-6, 2 blanks. Adams B2003 OCLC 49330763. Each the four parts has a divisional half title page and begins a new register. Gabriel Biel, (c 1420- 7 December 1495), was a Germanscholastic philosopher and member of the Canons Regular of the Congregation of Windesheim Biel was one of the founders of the University of Tübingen. Appointed in 1484 as the first professor of theology in the new faculty, he continued to be one of the most celebrated members of its faculty until his death, even serving as Rector in 1484 and 1489. His work consisted in the systematic development of the views of his master, William of Ockham. In later years, he was known as the "last of the Scholastics" Biel's first publication, on the Canon of the Mass, is of permanent interest and value. His second and most important work is a commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard, which would come to play a major influence on Martin Luther during the coming Reformation. In this he calls William of Ockham his master, but the last three books show him more Scotist than Nominalist. Matthias Scheeben describes him as "one of the best of the Nominalists, clear, exact, and more positive as well as more loyal to the Church than any of the others". . Biel held very progressive views in the field of political economy. According to him, the just price of a commodity is determined chiefly by human needs, by its scarcity, and by the difficulty of producing it. -- These and other similar subjects are discussed in Book IV of this Commentary to the "Sentences". ; Folio 13" - 23" tall; 480 pages

Title: Repertoriu[m] generale et succinctu[m]: veru[m]tamen valde vtile atq[ue] necessarium: co[n]tentoru[m] in quatuor collectorijs acutissimi ac p[ro]fundissimi theologi Gabrielis Biel super quatuor libros Sententiarum With medieval manuscript endpapers of Giles of Rome

Author Name: Biel, Gabriel; Peter Lombard

Categories: Religion - Scholastics, Manuscripts, Early Printed, Language -- Latin,

Publisher: Lyons, Johann Clein: 1519

Binding: Vellum

Book Condition: Good with no dust jacket

Seller ID: 8898

Keywords: Manuscripts Peter Lombard Sentences; Christian Theology Scholastics Giles,